OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 2 taxa in the family Taxaceae, Yew family, as understood by Weakley's Flora.

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drawing of Taxus canadensis, Canada Yew, American Yew need picture of Taxus canadensis, Canada Yew, American Yew need picture Taxus canadensis, Canada Yew, American Yew need picture of Taxus canadensis, Canada Yew, American Yew need picture of Taxus canadensis, Canada Yew, American Yew
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speaker icon Common Name: Canada Yew, American Yew

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Taxus canadensis   FAMILY: Taxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Taxus canadensis   FAMILY: Taxaceae

 

Habitat: Cliffs, bluffs, and rocky slopes over calcareous or mafic rocks, red spruce and hemlock swamps and bogs

Rare

Native to North Carolina

 


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camera icon Common Name: Florida Torreya, Stinking-cedar

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Torreya taxifolia   FAMILY: Taxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Torreya taxifolia   FAMILY: Taxaceae

 

Habitat: Moist ravines and bluffs, sometimes planted well outside its native range as an ornamental, and also rarely established near plantings

Rare or waif(s)

Native to Georgia Coastal Plain (introduced elsewhere in GA-NC-SC)

 


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"Botany I rank with the most valuable sciences, whether we consider its subjects as furnishing the principal subsistence of life to man and beast, delicious varieties for our tables, refreshments from our orchards, the adornments of our flower-borders, shade and perfume of our groves, materials for our buildings, or medicaments for our bodies." — Thomas Jefferson (1814)