OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 6 taxa in the family Hippocastanaceae, Buckeye family, as understood by Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Painted Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus sylvatica   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus sylvatica   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus sylvatica 116-01-001   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: In the Piedmont in mesic, nutrient-rich forests, on bottomlands, lower slopes, and in ravines, in the Coastal Plain primarily on floodplains of brownwater (alluvium-carrying) rivers (most notably the Roanoke River in NC), in the Mountains only at low elevations

Common in Piedmont (uncommon ro rare elsewhere in GA-NC-SC)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Red Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus pavia var. pavia   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus pavia var. pavia   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus pavia 116-01-002   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Coastal Plain marl forests (wet, calcareous flats), hardwood bluffs, rich floodplains of brownwater and blackwater rivers, basic-mesic forests, shell hammocks and shell middens, calcium-rich sandy soils in maritime forests

Common in GA Mountains & in Coastal Plain of GA & SC (uncommon in NC Coastal Plain) (rare in Piedmont)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Yellow Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus flava   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus flava   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus octandra 116-01-003   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Moist forests, up to nearly 2000 m, especially prominent in seepy cove forests, in the Piedmont only in ‘montane’ habitats

Common in Mountains, rare in Piedmont

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Ohio Buckeye, Fetid Buckeye, Chalky Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus glabra var. glabra   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus glabra var. glabra   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Mesic upland and riparian forests, bluffs, ravines, stream banks; usually over calcareous substrates

Rare

Native to Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Bottlebrush Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus parviflora   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus parviflora   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Mesic forests on bluffs and in ravines (the SC occurrence is on Fall Line river bluffs, with shaley, subcalcareous soils)

Rare in GA & SC (waifs in NC)

Native to South Carolina & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Horsechestnut

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Urban and suburban areas, perhaps not definitely naturalized, but fairly often planted as a street tree and escaping as seedlings in the vicinity of plantings

Waif(s)

Non-native: southeast Europe

 


Your search found 6 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Invasive exotics share several strong traits: fit well within the environment, grow rapidly, mature to produce flowers and seed at an early age, produce great quantities of seed, effectively disperse their seed (via birds, etc.), rampantly spread vegetatively, have no major pest of disease problems. Horticulturally, some of these characteristics are considered quite desirable. Thus there is the absurd irony of various governmental and environmental groups trying hard to control and eradicate in the wild some of the very same species being sold to gardeners all over the US...." — Margie Hunter, Gardening with the Native Plants of Tennessee