Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Balsaminaceae, Touch-me-not family, as understood by Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Pale Jewelweed, Pale Touch-me-not, Yellow Jewelweed, Yellow Touch-me-not
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Impatiens pallida   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Impatiens pallida   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Impatiens pallida 118-01-001   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Look for it in cove forests, streambanks, seepages, moist forests, bogs, roadsides

Common in NC Mountains, rare elsewhere in GA-NC-SC

Native to North Carolina & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Spotted Jewelweed, Spotted Touch-me-not, Orange Jewelweed, Orange Touch-me-not
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Impatiens capensis   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Impatiens capensis   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Impatiens capensis 118-01-002   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Look for it in moist forests, bottomlands, cove forests, streambanks, bogs

Common (rare in Coastal Plain of GA)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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Common Name: Ornamental Jewelweed, Himalayan Balsam, Indian Balsam
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) -   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae
PLANTS National Database: Impatiens glandulifera   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Non-native

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"... no amount of herbicide, biological, mechanical, or human power can hope to control invasive plants if the state's 17 million residents, homeowners and visitors continue to introduce invasive (or potentially invasive) plants into their backyards, or unknowingly dispose of them in natural areas." — Jeff Schardt, Florida Department of Environmental Protection/Bureau of Invasive Plant Management